Guidelines On The Use Of Antibiotic Cream, Antispetic Cream & Antibiotic Powder For The Treatment Of Skin Sores, Cuts & Scratches

We have a problem of antibiotics overuse in PNG. The same can be said for antibiotic or antiseptic creams for treating minor cuts and scratches. While working in the bush for an oil exploration company I decided to write a guideline for my field medics on the use of antibiotic and antiseptic cream in treating skin sores.

It is now widely accepted worldwide that microorganisms are increasingly becoming resistant to commonly prescribed antibiotics. This has been attributed to several factors including:

  •         Widespread use of antibiotic/anti-septic creams for minor cuts and scratches.
  •         Widespread prescribing of antibiotics for localized infections. E.g Amoxycillin for small skin sores.
  •       Prescribing of antibiotics where its use is not indicated. E.g. Amoxycillin for viral infections of the upper respiratory tract.
  •         Addition of antibiotics in animal feeds.

 

In contrast, the development of new generation of antibiotics has been slow.No new antibiotic has come into the market for the long time now. Therefore, to help reduce antibiotic resistance in microorganism, guidelines for the rationale prescribing of antibiotics have been developed. I therefore felt we needed to develop a set of guidelines for our field medics.

The guidelines stated below are for my field medics but anyone can use or adopt it depending on your environment and resources. 

Use of antibiotic/antiseptic cream guideline:

  1.     Antibiotic cream: No antibiotic cream is to be used when dressing sores, cuts and bruises.
  2.       Antiseptic cream: No anti-septic cream is to be used when dressing sores, cuts and bruises.
  3.         Antibiotic powder: No antibiotic powder is to be used when dressing sores, cuts and bruises. Application of amoxicillin or any other antibiotic powder to sores, cuts and bruises is strongly prohibited.
  4.       Antiseptic solution: These are to be used for cleaning sores, cuts, bruises and wounds ONLY.
  5.        Iodine based solutions: These are to be used for cleaning dirty and infected wounds, cuts, sores and scratches. They can also be used for dressing dirty and infected wounds, cuts, sores and scratches using soaked sterile gauze.

 

 ALL CLEAN, NON-INFECTED SORES ARE TO BE CLEANED WITH AN ANTISEPTIC SOLUTION AND DRESSED WITH STERILE DRESSING.

NO STAT ANTIBIOTICS FOR SORES, CUTS AND BRUISES ARE TO BE PRESCRIBED.

IF A WOUND OR SORE IS INFECTED, EVIDENCED BY:

  1.       PAIN
  2.       FEVER
  3.       OEDEMA
  4.       ENLARGED ASSOCIATED LYMPH NODES
  5.       PRESENCE OF PUS
  6.       OFFENSIVE SMELL

 

THEN AMOXYCILLIN 500MG ORALLY EVERY 8 HOURS CAN BE GIVEN FOR 7 DAYS. IF THERE IS NO AMOXYCILLIN, GIVE FLUCLOXACILLIN 5OOMG ORALLY EVERY 6 HOURS FOR 7 DAYS.

DISCLAIMER: Always consult your family physician if you are in any doubt. This is only a guide for general information only and should not be followed without consulting a physician first.

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About rodney itaki

I am a medical doctor from Papua New Guinea. My posts focuses on current and emerging health issues in PNG.
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8 Responses to Guidelines On The Use Of Antibiotic Cream, Antispetic Cream & Antibiotic Powder For The Treatment Of Skin Sores, Cuts & Scratches

  1. jaive says:

    Can I also use this on http://www.pngmoms.com with attribute and link to yur great wordpress site?

  2. Pingback: 2010 in review | Pacific Family Health Journal

  3. Reti says:

    No bacteria are becoming resistant to triple antibiotic ointment. The whole point of the stuff is about prevention. Why let a cut or ingrown toenail BECOME infected while in some stinking third world country while drilling for oil? Every fever or swollen foot is one more worker not being profitable and more money/time that must be spent getting them better. I suppose your general outlook on worldwide medical issues is admirable from one perspective, but the problem is not the overuse of antibiotics, but the improper use of them by patients who do not finish the full course they were prescribed.

  4. rodney itaki says:

    Thanks Reti. I would have to disagree on what you say about overuse of antibiotics because certainly there is overuse and misuse of antibiotics. Being compliant to medication is part of patient education and that’s what doctors should do when prescribing medications. Regardless of how busy they are. Doctors are also to blamed here.

  5. magnificent put up, very informative. I’m wondering why the opposite specialists of this sector don’t notice this. You must continue your writing. I’m confident, you have a great readers’ base already!

  6. So why do away with the antibiotic creams only to encourage antibiotics taken orally? Wouldn’t the use of a cream in the first stages of infection prevent the need for ‘more’ antibiotics later?

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